What is the difference between the two percentages in the Achievement Status and Growth summary?

Document created by Community User on Oct 13, 2016Last modified by Community User on Jun 6, 2017
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Question
What is the difference between the "Percentage of Students who Met or Exceeded their Projected RIT" and the "Overall Percentage of Projected RIT Met or Exceeded" on the Achievement Status and Growth (ASG) report?

Answer
In a nutshell, the first number is a percentage of students, whereas the second number is a percentage of RIT points. The first number answers the question, "How many students in my class met their growth projection?" The second number answers the question, "How much RIT growth did my class (as a whole) achieve, compared to their projection?"

 
Percentage of Students who Met or Exceeded their Projected RIT

This value ranges from 0% (no students met their projection) to 100% (all students met their projection). In the NWEA Norms, approximately 50% of students meet or exceed their growth projection.

 
Overall Percentage of Projected RIT Met or Exceeded

This value is a ratio of total growth to total projected growth. See Overall Percentage of Projected RIT Met or Exceeded for details on how this number is calculated. If the class's total RIT growth is equal to the total growth projection, this number will be 100%. You can consider 100% to be an "average" result. A number above 100% indicates that your class's total RIT growth was higher than projected, and below 100% indicates the class's total RIT growth was lower than projected.

 
What does it mean if one percentage is high and the other is low?

It is possible for a small number of students to skew the Overall Percentage number by performing well above or below expectations. For example, if the Overall Percentage of Projected RIT Met or Exceeded is above 100%, indicating higher-than-average growth, but the Percentage of Students who Met or Exceeded their Projected RIT is low, then this suggests that a small number of students performed very well compared to the rest of the group.

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2768

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